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Block Your Saboteur Before It Blocks Your Writing


The Saboteur has many faces: Attacker, Enticer, Innocent, Protector and Unlucky. Different routes to the same goal — to block our writing. Just when we think we’ve figured out how to identify the Saboteur and  avoid the roadblocks it sets up, it morphs into a different form and uses different techniques to invade our thinking. […]

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What Rejection Really Means to Writers


How much pain will you endure to bring your writing into readers’ hands? Writers don’t have to suffer for our art, but we do have to endure rejection along the way. And rejection hurts. Literally. Neurological research demonstrates that social exclusion and physical pain trigger the same type of activity in the anterior cingulate and […]

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Writers Arm Yourselves with Resistance Fighting Tools: Guest Post by Dave Chesson


  I’m pleased to introduce author and entrepreneur Dave Chesson as this week’s guest blogger. When Dave’s not light saber dueling with little jedi or sipping tea with princesses, he tests new book marketing tactics and helps authors improve their book sales. On his blog Kindlepreneur.com, Dave explains that he spent more than $15,000 in […]

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How to Enter the Writer’s Trance


To discover a story, writers use a different kind of cognitive activity and enter a different state of consciousness. Whether we call it the writer’s trance, creative flow, flow writing, freewriting, dreamstorming or the awakened dream, it’s where most writers find creative bliss. The writer’s trance is notoriously illusive, but you can enhance your ability […]

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The Creative Power of NOT Writing


In a previous post, I promised to explain why you should “keep your butt on the meditation cushion or your back on the yoga mat” in the early stages of writing. There is power is resisting the urge to write. I learned the value of delayed drafting at a writer’s conference decades ago. One of […]

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What Kind of Meditation Does Your Writing Need? Depends on What Stage It’s In


In my previous post, I suggested that writers need to alternate between focused-attention meditation and open-monitoring meditation. In some stages of the creative process, we need divergent thinking, which open-monitoring meditation increases. In other stages, we need  convergent thinking, which focused-attention meditation increases. (More about stages of the creative process in Chapter 4 of AWB) […]

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Do Writers Need to Keep Our Butts in the Chair?


In 1937, Sinclair Lewis shared his version of an often repeated and often reworded bit of writerly wisdom: And as the recipe for writing, all writing, I remember no high-flown counsel but always and only Mary Heaton Vorse’s jibe, delivered to a bunch of young and mostly incompetent hopefuls back in 1911: ‘The art of […]

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Would You Rather have Writer’s Block or Insomnia?


Insomnia: the frustrating and painful condition of wanting and needing to change your state of consciousness and being unable to do so. Writer’s Block: the frustrating and painful condition of wanting and needing to change your state of consciousness and being unable to do so. In both insomnia and writer’s block, you can’t make the […]

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How to Stop Giving Up Your Writing Time: Guest Post by Colleen M. Story


I found a new source of writing inspiration on Twitter’s MondayBlogs.  I particularly love it when I see a post from Colleen M. Story’s Writing and Wellness blog. And I kinda hate it because as I read Colleen’s post, I keep thinking “Exactly. This is so true. I should have written this.” Then I realize […]

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Why It Doesn’t Matter If Your Writing Is Any Good


On any given day, you can’t tell whether you’ll string words into powerful prose/evocative poetry or if you’ll just move crap around on the screen/page, making a mess that doesn’t add up to anything. It doesn’t matter. To write well, first you have to write. To write at all, you have to be willing to […]

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