Tag Archives: judgment never helps writers

Fact-Track Your Writing: Tricks of Tracking #4


How much do facts matter in your writing genre? When I was very young, I decided I’d write fiction because surely fiction couldn’t need facts the way journalism and nonfiction do, so I could just make everything up. Then I realized that fiction needs facts to ground the reader in the imaginary world. But when […]

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Discerning Writer’s Guide to Revision


To revise your writing, of course you must evaluate it. But evaluating is not the same as judging. Judging engages your mental filters and you stop seeing what’s really there. Once you assume something is good, you start seeing all the good things about it. Even neutral aspects will seem positive and negative aspects will […]

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How Do You Revise Without Letting the Saboteur Attack?


Revision requires that we see our writing for what it is: an approximation of our intended meaning and effect. We’re trying to recreate the same ideas and emotions in the reader that we experienced, to induce the same neurological state of consciousness, and we can’t do more than approximate that. The page will never hold […]

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Tricks of Tracking #4: Focus on Facts


Detective Joe Friday knew how to track: Focus on facts. When you track Process, Self-Care and Product Time, keep your attention on two facts: “This is what I said I’d do. This is what I did.” One of the benefits of tracking is that the feedback allows you to recognize changes in your patterns and […]

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Key Questions Part 2


After noticing what commitments you make to your writing (as recommended in last week’s post), the other significant questions are: Did you do what you said you’d do? And how do you feel about what you did? I encourage students in my Writing Habit class to stick to the facts when checking in about what […]

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