Archive | October, 2016
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If It Works for Stephen King, Shouldn’t It Work for Me?


Writers often look to famous authors for role models. We assume that whatever routine works (or worked) for a famous writer should work for every writer. If Stephen King writes 2,000 words a day, 365 days a year, every writer should write 2,000 words a day, 365 days a year. The problem is that what […]

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Deep Work, Deep Play: Writers Need Both


For writers, extended time without distractions and competing priorities is a pleasurable necessity; without it we cannot enter the writer’s trance, aka creative flow. We want and need what Cal Newport defines as Deep Work: “Professional activities performed in a state of distraction-free concentration that push your cognitive capabilities to their limit.” In Deep Work: […]

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How Hemingway Made ‘Attention Residue’ Work for Writing


Ernest Hemingway certainly never heard the term “attention residue,” but he knew how to make the phenomena work in favor of his writing. You can, too. In case you didn’t read the previous post, “Don’t Let ‘Attention Residue’ Derail Your Writing,” and haven’t heard of “attention residue” either, it’s what distracts you when you sit […]

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This is a stock photo. I wish I looked this good when I'm sick.

PTO – Back Next Week


In case you’re wondering what happened to this week’s post, Let Attention Residue Work for Your Writing, it’s still in progress. As soon as my swollen and over-active sinuses stop strangling my brain and the sniffling, sneezing, aching, coughing, stuffy head, fever, so I can’t think virus is done with me, I’ll be able to […]

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